I Know a Secret About Kohls….

Image courtesy of David Castillo Dominici / FreeDigitalPhotos.net Our son needed new dress clothes for his confirmation last weekend, so it was timely that we received a 30% off coupon in the mail from Kohls.  I usually don’t get excited about their coupons because they show up in my mailbox fairly often.  So frequently, in […]

Secret

Image courtesy of David Castillo Dominici / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Our son needed new dress clothes for his confirmation last weekend, so it was timely that we received a 30% off coupon in the mail from Kohls.  I usually don’t get excited about their coupons because they show up in my mailbox fairly often.  So frequently, in fact,  that I would never buy anything at Kohls unless I had a 30% off coupon in my hand. It should be fairly obvious that the regular price of their merchandise is simply over priced.

With mailing in hand, we headed to Kohls to see what they had. On the shopping list for our teenager were dress pants, a shirt with a collar (gasp), and new dress shoes. We were pleasantly surprised to find that each item was on sale as well, thus the 30% would be applied to the sale price resulting in deeper savings.

Jackpot

Here’s how our purchase broke down:

Dress Pants:

  • Regular price : $35.00
  • Sale Price : $21.99
  • After 30% off : $15.40

Shirt:

  • Regular price : $26.00
  • Sale Price : $12.99
  • After 30% off : $ 9.10

Dress Shoes:

  • Regular price : $75.00
  • Sale price : $37.99
  • After 30% off : $26.60

Total price for the outfit: $51.10

There was just one problem. In order to get the 30% off, customers are required to use a Kohls store credit card. We do have an account with them, however given our history of abusing credit cards we don’t care to use credit of any kind. Too many times we have charged something with every intent of paying it off immediately, but then letting the balance linger, and paying only the minimum payment requirement. Vonnie happened to mention this fact to the cashier as she extracted the card from her purse. The cashier then slipped us a nugget of information worth it’s weight in gold.

You only have to charge $1 to your account. You can pay the rest however you’d like.

The intent behind the required use of the card is clear. They hope people will be lured into the store with the sale coupons, then fall into the trap of using their line of credit to buy more than they originally intended.  It’s all too easy to do so because it’s no money out of their pocket at that moment. Then, when the bill comes they pay the minimum amount plus interest.  However, with this newly acquired information we can take advantage of the “double sale” opportunity while only using our line of credit for a very minimal amount that is easily paid off.

Were you aware that this was possible at Kohls?  Do you know of any other similar circumstances that would help out other readers?

 

  • Published On : 5 months ago on June 17, 2017
  • Author By :
  • Last Updated : June 26, 2017 @ 7:34 am
  • In The Categories Of : My Blog

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